Maharashtra Divert 25 cane for ethanol production sugar commissioner tells industry

first_imgThe central government has fixed three price slabs for ethanol, depending on the source of production. The highest price is fixed for ethanol produced directly from cane juice (Rs 59.19 per litre), followed by C heavy molasses (Rs 43.47 per litre) and B heavy molasses (Rs 52.23 per litre). “The present rates are conducive, but we need assurance from the government that these prices will remain the same for at least 10 years,” said a miller from Kolhapur.Another worry for millers is that most mills are not utilising their capacity. Maharashtra’s requirement for 10 per cent blended fuel is 44 crore litres, while across the nation, oil companies have floated tenders of 450 crore litres. Excess production and low uptake of sugar have had an adverse effect on the economics of sugar mills. Mills had defaulted in payment of the Fair and Remunerative Price (FRP), fixed by the central government for cane that millers purchase from growers. Last year, in order to help millers develop a permanent solution to this problem, the central government had announced a new ethanol policy, which was in line with its scheme to achieve 10 per cent blending of ethanol into petrol to bring down import bills. Till date, only 6 per cent blending has been achieved.The policy was to allow mills to expand their existing capacity for ethanol production. The government had also allowed production of ethanol directly from cane juice, as well as from C heavy and B heavy molasses. A financial package saw the government allowing for mills to avail soft loans for expansion/construction of new facilities. A total of 60 mills from Maharashtra were found eligible for availing this loan. However, none of the new facilities will be ready before the next crushing season, given the time taken for completion of paper work.At present, 69 cooperative, 32 private and nine stand-alone units in the state have distillery units, and total production capacity is 136.70 crore. 56 mills (31 cooperative, 23 private and 2 stand-alone units) have exclusive ethanol production facility with a capacity of 71.26 litres. Advertising Cabinet approves Rs 8,500 crore bailout package for sugar industry Maharashtra banks stonewall mills by clearing only 25 per cent soft loans to pay off cane dues Written by Parthasarathi Biswas | Pune | Published: July 2, 2019 9:44:21 am Advertising What ails sugar production in Maharashtra Another worry for millers is that most mills are not utilising their capacity.Maharashtra Sugar Commissioner Shekhar Gaikwad has advised the industry to divert 25 per cent cane for ethanol production for the next season. However, sugar millers in Maharashtra are circumspect as uncertainties regarding price and lifting continue to haunt the sector, despite special schemes announced by the central government last year to expand their ethanol production and allowing them to produce it directly from cane juice. Millers now say they are looking for long-term commitment from the central government to keep prices steady for at least 10 years, which will allow them to recover investments in new machinery. Related News Crushing season ends, one of the shortest in Maharashtra 0 Comment(s)last_img read more

Artificial intelligence turns brain activity into speech

first_img M. Angrick et al., doi.org/10.1101/478644 Original audio from a study participant, followed by a computer recreation of each word, based on activity in speech planning and motor areas of the brain. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Artificial intelligence turns brain activity into speech 00:0000:0000:00 Email Another team, led by computer scientist Tanja Schultz at the University Bremen in Germany, relied on data from six people undergoing brain tumor surgery. A microphone captured their voices as they read single-syllable words aloud. Meanwhile, electrodes recorded from the brain’s speech planning areas and motor areas, which send commands to the vocal tract to articulate words. Computer scientists Miguel Angrick and Christian Herff, now with Maastricht University, trained a network that mapped electrode readouts to the audio recordings, and then reconstructed words from previously unseen brain data. According to a computerized scoring system, about 40% of the computer-generated words were understandable. 00:0000:0000:00 WENHT/ISTOCK.COM The hurdles are high. “We are trying to work out the pattern of … neurons that turn on and off at different time points, and infer the speech sound,” says Nima Mesgarani, a computer scientist at Columbia University. “The mapping from one to the other is not very straightforward.” How these signals translate to speech sounds varies from person to person, so computer models must be “trained” on each individual. And the models do best with extremely precise data, which requires opening the skull.Researchers can do such invasive recording only in rare cases. One is during the removal of a brain tumor, when electrical readouts from the exposed brain help surgeons locate and avoid key speech and motor areas. Another is when a person with epilepsy is implanted with electrodes for several days to pinpoint the origin of seizures before surgical treatment. “We have, at maximum, 20 minutes, maybe 30,” for data collection, Martin says. “We’re really, really limited.”The groups behind the new papers made the most of precious data by feeding the information into neural networks, which process complex patterns by passing information through layers of computational “nodes.” The networks learn by adjusting connections between nodes. In the experiments, networks were exposed to recordings of speech that a person produced or heard and data on simultaneous brain activity.Mesgarani’s team relied on data from five people with epilepsy. Their network analyzed recordings from the auditory cortex (which is active during both speech and listening) as those patients heard recordings of stories and people naming digits from zero to nine. The computer then reconstructed spoken numbers from neural data alone; when the computer “spoke” the numbers, a group of listeners named them with 75% accuracy.center_img By Kelly ServickJan. 2, 2019 , 1:30 PM A computer reconstruction based on brain activity recorded while a person listened to spoken digits. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country For many people who are paralyzed and unable to speak, signals of what they’d like to say hide in their brains. No one has been able to decipher those signals directly. But three research teams recently made progress in turning data from electrodes surgically placed on the brain into computer-generated speech. Using computational models known as neural networks, they reconstructed words and sentences that were, in some cases, intelligible to human listeners.None of the efforts, described in papers in recent months on the preprint server bioRxiv, managed to re-create speech that people had merely imagined. Instead, the researchers monitored parts of the brain as people either read aloud, silently mouthed speech, or listened to recordings. But showing the reconstructed speech is understandable is “definitely exciting,” says Stephanie Martin, a neural engineer at the University of Geneva in Switzerland who was not involved in the new projects.People who have lost the ability to speak after a stroke or disease can use their eyes or make other small movements to control a cursor or select on-screen letters. (Cosmologist Stephen Hawking tensed his cheek to trigger a switch mounted on his glasses.) But if a brain-computer interface could re-create their speech directly, they might regain much more: control over tone and inflection, for example, or the ability to interject in a fast-moving conversation. Finally, neurosurgeon Edward Chang and his team at the University of California, San Francisco, reconstructed entire sentences from brain activity captured from speech and motor areas while three epilepsy patients read aloud. In an online test, 166 people heard one of the sentences and had to select it from among 10 written choices. Some sentences were correctly identified more than 80% of the time. The researchers also pushed the model further: They used it to re-create sentences from data recorded while people silently mouthed words. That’s an important result, Herff says—”one step closer to the speech prosthesis that we all have in mind.”However, “What we’re really waiting for is how [these methods] are going to do when the patients can’t speak,” says Stephanie Riès, a neuroscientist at San Diego State University in California who studies language production. The brain signals when a person silently “speaks” or “hears” their voice in their head aren’t identical to signals of speech or hearing. Without external sound to match to brain activity, it may be hard for a computer even to sort out where inner speech starts and ends.Decoding imagined speech will require “a huge jump,” says Gerwin Schalk, a neuroengineer at the National Center for Adaptive Neurotechnologies at the New York State Department of Health in Albany. “It’s really unclear how to do that at all.”One approach, Herff says, might be to give feedback to the user of the brain-computer interface: If they can hear the computer’s speech interpretation in real time, they may be able to adjust their thoughts to get the result they want. With enough training of both users and neural networks, brain and computer might meet in the middle.*Clarification, 8 January, 5:50 p.m.: This article has been updated to clarify which researchers worked on one of the projects. Epilepsy patients with electrode implants have aided efforts to decipher speech. H. Akbari et al., doi.org/10.1101/350124 Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Study of marathon runners reveals a hard limit on human endurance

first_imgHumans’ peak metabolic activity during extraordinary feats of endurance is limited by their biology. iStock.com/Pavel1964 Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Study of marathon runners reveals a ‘hard limit’ on human endurance Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img By Michael PriceJun. 5, 2019 , 2:00 PM Email Athletes who can run the equivalent of 117 marathons in just months might seem unstoppable. The biggest obstacle, it turns out, is their own bodies. A new study quantifies for the first time an unsurpassable “ceiling” for endurance activities such as long-distance running and biking—and it also finds that pregnancy’s metabolic toll resembles that of an ultramarathon.“It’s very cool data,” says Harvard University evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman, who wasn’t involved with work. “It makes a very convincing case that at the extremes of human endurance, there’s a hard limit.”Physiologists and athletes alike have long been interested in just how far the human body can push itself. When exercising over a few hours, a wealth of evidence suggests most people—and mammals—max out at about five times their basal metabolic rate (BMR), or the amount of energy they expend while they’re at rest. How humans use energy during longer endurance activities is another question entirely, says Herman Pontzer, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Pontzer saw an opportunity to answer that question when Bryce Carlson, an endurance athlete and former anthropologist at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, organized the Race Across the USA in 2015. Runners covered 4957 kilometers over the course of 20 weeks in a series of marathons stretching from Los Angeles, California, to Washington, D.C.To find out how many calories the athletes in the study burned, Pontzer, Carlson, and colleagues replaced the normal hydrogen and oxygen in their drinking water with harmless, uncommon isotopes of those elements—deuterium and oxygen-18. By chemically tracing how these isotopes flush out in urine, sweat, and exhaled breath, scientists can calculate how much carbon dioxide an athlete produces—a measure that directly relates to how many calories they burn.Pontzer’s team measured the initial BMRs of six runners, five men and one woman. Then they collected energy expenditure data over the course of the race to see how many calories they burned per day. The researchers plotted those data over time and analyzed them along with previously collected metabolic data from other endurance events, including triathlons, 160-kilometer ultramarathons, long-distance cycling races like the Tour de France, and Arctic expeditions.They found that no matter the event, energy expenditure sharply leveled off after about 20 days, eventually plateauing at about 2.5 times an athlete’s BMR. At that point, the body is burning calories more quickly than it can absorb food and convert it into energy, representing a biologically determined ceiling on human performance, the researchers report today in Science Advances. After an athlete hits this ceiling, their body must dip into fat reserves for energy. “It was just one of those beautiful moments of discovery that as a scientist you just live for,” Pontzer says. “We ended up plotting out the very limits of human endurance, the envelope for what humans can do.”Brent Ruby, an exercise physiologist at the University of Montana in Missoula who wasn’t involved in the study, says the new findings demonstrate how ultraendurance athletes can expend energy over long periods without losing body weight.In a second finding, the authors report that human pregnancy—the energy expenditure of which has been measured in earlier studies—demands about the same level of energy as long athletic endurance events. It is also governed by the same metabolic constraints. “To think about pregnancy in the same terms that we think about Tour de France cyclists and triathletes makes you realize how incredibly demanding pregnancy is on the body,” Pontzer says.Some researchers, including Lieberman, have hypothesized that humans evolved bodies that can run long distances in order to hunt down large, calorie-rich animals, and that those same metabolic adaptations could have allowed human mothers to birth larger babies with bigger brains. Given that pregnancy and endurance activities operate under the same metabolic rules, it could have been the other way around, Pontzer argues: Perhaps humans evolved to have bigger-brained babies, which then afforded our species more endurance.On that point, Lieberman isn’t convinced. “That’s a pretty big leap to make and would need a lot more evidence to support it,” he says. “Let’s take it one step at a time—just like a marathon.”*Correction, 7 June, 12:20 p.m.: The original version of this article incorrectly noted that Brent Ruby implied that athletes should load up on fat before endurance events. He actually said that the findings show that athletes’ bodies adapt to endurance events so they don’t need to dip into their fat stores.last_img read more

Karnataka crisis Rebel Cong MLA Nagaraj heads to Mumbai

first_img Related News If the resignations of the 16 MLAs are accepted, the ruling coalition’s tally will be reduced to 100. The speaker has a vote too. Advertising “I’m also trying for it (withdraw). Only thing is that I have to meet Sudhakar, I haven’t met him. I will meet him, he should be somewhere,” he said, adding “my intention is that we have to withdraw it (resignation) together.”After almost day-long negotiations on Saturday, it appeared that Congress had made some headway in pacifying Nagaraj, who had hinted that he might consider withdrawing his resignation, but fell short of making any final announcement.A day after Kumaraswamy made a surprise announcement in the Assembly that he would seek a trust vote, marathon meetings were held by coalition leaders, including Siddaramaiah, Kumaraswamy and Minister D K Shivakumar, with Nagaraj on Saturday.However, Nagaraj on his part maintained his stand that he will take any call on withdrawal only after talks with Sudhakar, as they both had decided to resign together. Bracing for SC hearing and trust vote, Karnataka parties hide their MLAs karnataka crisis, crisis in karnataka, karnataka coalition crisis, mtb nagaraj, mtb nagaraj karnataka, karnataka mla mtb nagaraj, india news, Indian Express The Hoskote MLA had maintained that he intended to take a final decision on the withdrawal of his resignation after talks with Chikkaballapura MLA K Sudhakar, as both had together submitted resignation to the Speaker on July 10. (File)Efforts by coalition leaders to mollify rebel Congress MLA M T B Nagaraj seem to have failed as he has flown to Mumbai Sunday, according to sources. More Explained Best Of Express Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook By PTI |Bengaluru | Published: July 14, 2019 2:25:03 pm Visuals of Nagaraj boarding a chartered flight have also surfaced on local news channels.Nagaraj, who was Housing Minister in the Kumaraswamy government before he resigned, however, maintained that he was still in the Congress party.“Sudhakar has switched off his phone, and is not available for the last two days. After pacifying and convincing Sudhakar, I will try to bring him back. Because we both had resigned together, so we want to be united. I have informed this to Congress leaders,” Nagaraj told reporters here before leaving his residence.Stating that he was still in the Congress, he said leaders, including Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy and CLP leader Siddaramaiah, have asked him to withdraw the resignation. Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Leaders of the Congress-JD(S) coalition held negotiations with Nagaraj on Saturday in a bid to woo him back to save the H D Kumaraswamy-led government in Karnataka that is on the brink of collapse.The Hoskote MLA had maintained that he intended to take a final decision on the withdrawal of his resignation after talks with Chikkaballapura MLA K Sudhakar, as both had together submitted resignation to the Speaker on July 10.According to the sources, Nagaraj is now on his way to Mumbai to join Sudhakar, who is said to be along with other MLAs who have quit and are camping there. Advertising The Hoskote MLA had even said he would also try to pacify Sudhakar and convince him to withdraw the resignation.Responding to a question on his decision if he was unable to meet Sudhakar, Nagaraj said, “Then, what should be my decision, I will decide it tomorrow morning.”Asked what he would do if Sudhakar did not agree to withdraw his resignation, Nagaraj said, “I will think about it and decide.”Nagaraj is among the five rebel Congress MLAs, who had moved the Supreme Court on Saturday against the Assembly Speaker K R Ramesh Kumar not accepting their resignation.MLAs Anand Singh, K Sudhakar, N Nagaraj (MTB), Munirathna and Roshan Baig have sought impleadment in the already pending application filed by the 10 other rebel MLAs on which hearing is scheduled for Tuesday.The coalition government is on a sticky wicket with 16 MLAs — 13 of the Congress and three of the JD(S) — resigning their assembly membership. Besides, two independent legislators, who were made ministers recently to provide stability, have quit the cabinet.The independents — H Nagesh and R Shankar — too have withdrawn support to the coalition government and are now supporting the BJP.The ruling coalition’s strength in the House is 116 (Congress 78, JD(S) 37 and BSP one), besides the speaker.With the support of the two independents, the opposition BJP has 107 MLAs in the 224-member House. Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Karnataka crisis: SC to give verdict on rebel MLAs plea against Speaker tomorrow NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Phase 3 ECHELON2 clinical trial evaluating ADCETRIS plus CHP meets primary endpoint

first_img Source:http://investor.seattlegenetics.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=124860&p=RssLanding&cat=news&id=2369513 Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 1 2018Seattle Genetics, Inc. and Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited announced today that the phase 3 ECHELON-2 clinical trial met its primary endpoint. The trial demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) of ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin) in combination with CHP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, prednisone) versus the control arm, CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). ECHELON-2 is a global, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial evaluating ADCETRIS as part of a frontline combination chemotherapy regimen in patients with previously untreated CD30-expressing peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), also known as mature T-cell lymphoma (MTCL). ADCETRIS is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) directed to CD30, which is expressed on the surface of several types of PTCL. ADCETRIS is currently not approved for the frontline treatment of PTCL.Patients in ECHELON-2 were randomized to receive either a combination of ADCETRIS plus CHP or CHOP, a recognized standard of care for frontline PTCL. Results from the trial demonstrated that combination treatment with ADCETRIS plus CHP was superior to the control arm for PFS as assessed by an Independent Review Facility (IRF; hazard ratio=0.71; p-value=0.0110). The ADCETRIS plus CHP arm also demonstrated superior overall survival (OS), a key secondary endpoint, compared to CHOP (hazard ratio=0.66; p-value=0.0244). All other key secondary endpoints, including PFS in patients with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL), complete remission rate and objective response rate were statistically significant in favor of the ADCETRIS plus CHP arm. The safety profile of ADCETRIS plus CHP in the ECHELON-2 trial was comparable to CHOP and consistent with the established safety profile of ADCETRIS in combination with chemotherapy. Additional data will be presented at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2018 annual meeting, December 1-4, 2018, in San Diego, California.”Peripheral T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with approximately 4,000 CD30-expressing patients diagnosed every year in the United States,” said Clay Siegall, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Seattle Genetics. “We are excited about the groundbreaking results of the phase 3 ECHELON-2 clinical trial, which demonstrated ADCETRIS in combination with chemotherapy significantly improved treatment outcomes for adult patients with previously untreated CD30-expressing PTCL compared with the current standard of care (CHOP). We’d like to thank the many investigators and patients who participated in this study and contributed to this significant milestone for the PTCL community. We look forward to presenting results at the ASH annual meeting in December and intend to submit a supplemental Biologics License Application to the FDA for approval in this setting in the near future.”Related StoriesNANOLIVE‘s novel CX-A defines a new standard for live cell imaging in 96 well plates for continuous organelle monitoring in cell populationsComprehensive cell atlas of the human liverRetina can restructure itself following gene therapy”These clinically meaningful results from ECHELON-2 represent a significant step in the development of a potential frontline treatment in this disease. This trial is the largest randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial in PTCL,” said Jesús Gomez-Navarro, M.D., Vice President, Head of Oncology Clinical Research and Development, Takeda. “Standard of care in PTCL has not changed in several decades and there remains an unmet need for patients. These data showed a significant improvement in the primary endpoint of progression-free survival and all key secondary endpoints, including overall survival, along with a manageable safety profile. We look forward to sharing these data with regulatory authorities globally.”Takeda and Seattle Genetics plan to submit these results to regulatory authorities for approval in their respective territories.ECHELON-2 Phase 3 Clinical Trial DesignThe randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial is investigating ADCETRIS plus CHP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, prednisone) versus CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) as frontline therapy in patients with CD30-expressing peripheral T-cell lymphoma, also known as mature T-cell lymphoma. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival (PFS) per Independent Review Facility assessment, with events defined as progression, death, or receipt of chemotherapy for residual or progressive disease. Secondary endpoints include PFS in patients with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL), complete remission rate, overall survival and objective response rate, in addition to safety. The multi-center trial was conducted at sites across North America, Europe and Asia and was designed to enroll 450 patients, approximately 75 percent of whom were to be diagnosed with sALCL. The ECHELON-2 trial is being conducted under a Special Protocol Assessment (SPA) agreement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the trial also received European Medicines Agency (EMA) scientific advice.last_img read more

Judge who invalidated Obamacare has been a goto judge for Republicans critics

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 20 2018U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor has a history of siding with Republicans on ideologically motivated lawsuits. His ruling last week, in which he sided with the GOP on a challenge to the Affordable Care Act, was not a one-off.In fact, critics say, his history is ultimately why that case was before him in the first place.By all accounts, O’Connor’s ruling is sweeping. It says the entire health care law became invalid when Congress zeroed out, in 2017, the tax penalty for Americans who don’t have health insurance — a penalty that had been tied to what’s known as the law’s individual mandate that nearly everyone have insurance.“I think he went too far in rejecting the entire law,” said Josh Blackman, a conservative legal scholar and professor at the South Texas College of Law in Houston. “I think he could have stopped short and simply severed the Obamacare mandate.”While O’Connor’s decision may seem a bit extreme to some legal scholars, it wasn’t surprising.Justin Nelson, a law professor at the University of Texas at Austin, said if you know anything about O’Connor’s past rulings, this was predictable.“In case after case,” Nelson said, “what he has shown is that he has tended to side with the Republican attorneys general who are bringing ideological suits.”Nelson recently ran an unsuccessful campaign to oust Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who led this multistate legal challenge to the health care law. Nelson said Paxton and the other Republican attorneys general have filed lawsuits in the U.S District Court for the Northern District of Texas because they know there’s a good chance they’ll get O’Connor as the judge.“Judge O’Connor has been the go-to judge for Ken Paxton and Republican attorneys general who want to file ideological suits in any court across the country,” Nelson said. “Reed O’Connor is their best shot to get a ruling that they like.”O’Connor, who did not respond to NPR’s requests for comment, was a Republican staffer on Capitol Hill before he was nominated to the federal bench by George W. Bush in 2007. So far, he has had to weigh in on at least a couple of contentious issues.For example, O’Connor is known for striking down an Obama-era rule that protected transgender students. In that case he also sided with Paxton, who filed that legal challenge.Related StoriesFamily members’ drugs may be risk factor for overdose in individuals without prescriptionsDOJ lawyers try new tricks to undo Obamacare. Will it work?Experts release scientific statement on predicting survival for cardiac arrest survivors“They’ve done this over and over again on the hope that Judge O’Connor would rule on behalf of an ideological agenda,” Nelson said. “And I don’t think that is proper. I don’t think that is right.”Paxton has filed lawsuits in other courts, too. He filed challenges to Obama-era immigration laws in a court in South Texas, which also has a reliably conservative judge on the bench.Blackman said criticism of this practice is “overblown.”“All lawyers generally file the case where it leads to the best chance of success,” Blackman said. “And to the extent that [there’s a] criticism — that’s criticism of the attorney general and not of the judge. The judge doesn’t control which cases come to him.”Furthermore, because O’Connor is getting a lot of ideological lawsuits brought to him, it’s making his voting record more controversial, Blackman added.“I think by virtue of the attorney generals’ form selection,” he said, “Judge O’Connor’s had a greater share than average of hot-button issues.”However, Blackman said, he is concerned that criticisms of controversial opinions are increasingly shifting toward the judges who issue the opinions — instead of toward the decisions themselves.“President Trump does this all the time,” Blackman said. “Politicians do it all time. And usually this happens to Supreme Court justices, but here it is being done to a district court judge in Fort Worth — who, 99 percent of his docket no one will even know about.”No matter how controversial O’Connor’s ruling on the health care law, Blackman said, the decision over the Affordable Care Act will now pass to another judge, as the case moves on to a higher court.This story is part of a partnership that includes KUT, NPR and Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

Infants with bronchiolitis are at increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in

first_img Source:https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/190428/common-chest-infection-puts-babies-risk/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 6 2019Infants who are admitted to hospital with the common infection bronchiolitis are at increased risk of further emergency hospital admissions for asthma, wheezing and respiratory illness in the first five years of their life.These are the findings of researchers from Imperial College London, who tracked 613,377 babies (almost all births in England between April 2007 – March 2008) up to the age of five years. Around 16, 000 babies were admitted to hospital with bronchiolitis before their first birthday.Researchers found these children had up to a fivefold risk of emergency admissions to hospital with asthma, wheezing or a respiratory illness in the first five years of their life, compared with those who were not admitted for bronchiolitis.The researchers found that one in five children admitted to hospital with bronchiolitis as a baby will have a subsequent emergency hospital admission for asthma, wheeze, or respiratory infections.Dr Helen Skirrow, lead author of the research from the School of Public Health at Imperial, said: “We know that hospital admissions for bronchiolitis have been rising over recent years in England. Previous studies have suggested a link between the condition and an increased risk of conditions such as asthma, but this is the largest study to suggest a severe case of bronchiolitis can result in subsequent emergency admissions for asthma and other respiratory conditions. “Dr Skirrow added: “An emergency hospital admission is incredibly stressful for children and their families, and also places a burden on hospitals. If we develop interventions to prevent the initial bout of bronchiolitis – we may also be able to reduce the number of subsequent emergency admissions.”Bronchiolitis is a common type of chest infection that affects around one in three children in their first year of life, most commonly babies between three and six months of age.The condition causes the airways to become inflamed, triggering symptoms such as a fever, cough and wheezing. The majority of children get better on their own – however up to one in 20 (2-5%) will require hospital treatment if they develop more severe symptoms, such as breathing difficulties.Most cases of bronchiolitis are caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) which is responsible for around 3.2 million hospital admissions every year worldwide. Although there is no treatment for bronchiolitis, children thought to be at risk of RSV infection, such as babies born prematurely, can be given a preventative treatment called palivizumab. There are also a number of RSV vaccines currently in development.Related StoriesEliminating asthma triggers right at the source to create healthier homesStudy estimates health care costs of uncontrolled asthma in the U.S. over next 20 yearsStudy examines differences in genetic risk factors for childhood-onset and adult-onset asthmaMany factors contribute to a baby’s risk of being admitted to hospital for bronchiolitis and other respiratory illnesses. These include exposure to tobacco smoke inside the home, environmental factors (such as air quality) and whether a child was breastfed.The team say this current finding, published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, highlight the importance of preventing cases of bronchiolitis.Professor Sonia Saxena, senior author and head of Imperial’s Child Health Unit, added: “Having your baby admitted to hospital with a serious chest infection like bronchiolitis is a frightening experience for parents. Our study shows these children are at high risk of subsequent hospital admission for asthma and recurrent infections across the early years of life, so we should be doing all we can to prevent this happening. Health professionals should counsel parents about benefits of breastfeeding, avoid infant’s exposure to tobacco smoke and raise parent’s awareness of when and how to seek help for respiratory problems as their child develops during preschool years.”When analysing the findings the research team took into account infants with pre-existing conditions. The scientists say more work is still needed to investigate why bronchiolitis may be linked to subsequent respiratory problems such as asthma. One theory is the initial viral infection that caused bronchiolitis may alter the immune system’s response, increasing the chance of subsequent asthma and wheezing. Or it may be that a baby remains exposed to the initial triggers of bronchiolitis, such as second-hand smoke or pollution, which subsequently triggers asthma or other respiratory conditions.The team say the research also highlights the need to develop a vaccine against RSV, which would help prevent cases of bronchiolitis.Dr Skirrow explained: “There are a number of trials underway at the moment developing an RSV vaccine that could either be given to new-borns or pregnant women. This work provides more evidence of the importance of investing in this research, and the effect it could have on children’s long-term health.”last_img read more

Predicting whether a patient will benefit from chemotherapy

first_img Source:http://case.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 25 2019Case Western Reserve University researchers and partners, including a collaborator at Cleveland Clinic, are pushing the boundaries of how “smart” diagnostic-imaging machines identify cancers–and uncovering clues outside the tumor to tell whether a patient will respond well to chemotherapy.The recent findings in breast and lung cancer research build off work pioneered by biomedical engineering professor Anant Madabhushi, founder of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics. He is senior author on a pair of recent journal publications and joined by scientists from the Case School of Engineering, Cleveland Clinic and New York University Langone Medical Center.This work, in total, heralds a more personalized future in medical diagnoses, Madabhushi said.”And it is further evidence that information gleaned by computational interrogation of the region outside the tumors on MRI (magnetic resonance images) and CAT (computed tomography) scans is extremely valuable and can predict response and benefit of chemotherapy in lung and breast cancer patients,” said Madabhushi, the F. Alex Nason Professor II of Biomedical Engineering at the Case School of Engineering.Madabhushi founded the center in 2012 and has more than 50 collaborators working on related projects. The lab has become a global leader in the detection, diagnosis and characterization of various cancers and other diseases by meshing medical imaging, machine learning and artificial intelligence.Hope for HER2 breast cancer The most recent research–published April 19 in JAMA Network Open–focuses on markers on tissue outside a breast tumor that can indicate whether a patient will respond to targeted chemotherapy.Biomedical Engineering doctoral researcher Nathaniel Braman and medical school faculty member Vinay Varadan led a team of collaborators who reported discovery of a previously hidden “signature” associated with one type of breast cancer, known as HER2-positive (or simply HER2). It comprises about 20% of all cases and receives a special targeted treatment strategy.The researchers have been able to classify the patients with HER2 breast cancer into molecular subtypes–corresponding to those who will likely respond to targeted chemotherapy and those who won’t–simply by analyzing an initial tissue sample.The work “provides insights into the ability of radiomic analyses to capture clinically-significant tumor biology,” explained Varadan, a co-senior author on the study with Madabhushi. It “justifies additional studies to assess the clinical utility of such noninvasive approaches to guide therapeutic strategies in this disease.”The markers are not found on images made from tissue slides, but outside the tumor itself. They cannot be seen by the human eye, but are revealed by a process known as radiomics, which extracts relevant data from medical images like MRIs.”Right now, these patients receive ‘one-size-fits-all’ treatment despite being quite diverse,” Braman said. “What we’re trying to do here is identify before treatment which patients will actually benefit from specific therapies. This could give doctors and patients information they did not have before.”Related StoriesExercise program improves anxiety, mood in older adults who received chemotherapyChemotherapy can wreak havoc on the heartRutgers researchers create new device to see if targeted cancer therapy is workingPutting the idea into use is probably years away, following clinical trials and then the big step of someday “getting doctors to be able to trust and use it,” Braman said.To that end, the researchers wrote that they explored the overlap between their imaging signature and information from the tissue slides and genetics that doctors consider important in treatment decisions.Radiomics of region outside lung nodule predicts benefit of chemotherapy The other study, published in March, also evaluates whether computer-extracted image patterns (or radiomics) outside a tumor can indicate whether a lung cancer patient will respond to targeted chemotherapy.”The problem at the start is that only one in four lung cancer patients will respond favorably to chemotherapy, but virtually everyone gets that treatment,” said biomedical engineering doctoral researcher Mohammadhadi Khorrami, one of the leaders of the research. “But all of the previous research has been limited to inside the tumor.”In this case, the researchers examined image data from 125 Cleveland Clinic patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All had previously received targeted chemotherapy, but only about half had responded to the difficult treatment.Using the information gleaned from those patients’ data, researchers trained their technology to distinguish between image data of patients who had responded and those who had not. Then they tested the technology against additional patient data.”By looking both inside and outside the tumor,” Khorrami said, “we achieved an accuracy of 77% in determining which patients would benefit from chemotherapy–far better (68%) than just looking at the tumor itself.”Khorrami was the first author of a team of 10 researchers who published the research with Monica Khunger, a Cleveland Clinic physician at the time of the study, now employed by UPMC in Pittsburgh.) Their work appeared in March in the journal Radiology: Artificial Intelligence.Using radiomics, researchers can extract quantitative, or measurable, data from CT images that can reveal disease characteristics not visible in the images alone, according to a Radiological Society of America’s news release on the research.”This can change the game, not only for the patient when it comes to outcome, but when it comes to cost overall for the health-care field,” Khorrami said. “It costs about $30,000 or more a year for chemotherapy, so it’s important to know who will respond to chemotherapy, and we’re getting closer to a true biomarker to do that.”last_img read more

Researchers identify genetic factor linked to development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

first_imgOne limitation of this study is that it included only white subjects, so it’s not known whether these findings also apply to people of other races. The study is important because it’s the first real effort to have a genome wide search for genes predisposing to this complication of diabetes. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is often overlooked. Yet nearly one-fourth of the annual US expenditure on diabetes is due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy.”Hetal Shah, MD, MPH – a study senior author and a Research Associate at the Joslin Diabetes Center and Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 12 2019Researchers from Joslin Diabetes Center, using a genome-wide association study, have identified a genetic factor linked to the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This finding suggests a new target for preventive therapies. The research has been published online and will appear in the August print issue of Diabetes.While neuropathy, which causes pain or numbness in the legs and an increase risk of foot ulcers, is a major problem for many people with diabetes, there is significant variability in its onset: some people develop this complication, and others do not, says Alessandro Doria, MD, PhD, MPH, a study senior author and Director of the Molecular Phenotyping and Genotyping at Joslin Diabetes Center and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “Therefore, we wanted to see if we could discover genetic factors that predispose people with diabetes to developing this complication versus being protected from it.”For this study, researchers used an approach called a genome-wide association study, or GWAS. This analysis is used to find disease-associated variants throughout the genome. A GWAS for diabetic peripheral neuropathy was carried out in 5,168 participants from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) clinical trial — 4,384 with evidence of peripheral neuropathy and 784 who were spared this complication.After screening millions of small variations of the genome sequence (genetic variants), the study identified a region on chromosome 2q24 as having a powerful impact on the risk of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. While the precise mechanisms are not known, there were some hints that the genetic variants in this region may act by affecting a nearby sodium channel regulating the transmission of sensory signals in peripheral nerves.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeDoes genetic testing affect psychosocial health?Genetic contribution to distractibility helps explain procrastination”People carrying the less frequent variant at that location were protected from neuropathy and people carrying the more common variant at that same location were predisposed to this complication,” says Doria.The implication is that this could be a target for pharmacological therapy to protect people from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. “We found that people with the protective allele have higher amounts of this sodium channel,” says Doria. “This suggests that the sodium channel in the peripheral nerves might be used to protect people from neuropathy, by developing a drug that activates this channel.”This finding was replicated in an independent study, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial.center_img Source:Joslin Diabetes Centerlast_img read more

Women more likely to have brain aneurysms than men

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 27 2019Lindsay Bowerman was sitting at her kitchen table preparing to take her sons to their swim lessons when she felt a “snap” in her head that was immediately followed by intense pressure and the worst pain she had ever experienced. The healthy 36-year-old woman had just suffered a ruptured brain aneurysm.A brain aneurysm is a when a weak spot on an artery balloons out and fills with blood. It is estimated that more than 6 million people in the United States have an unruptured brain aneurysm, with approximately 30,000 rupturing each year. Forty percent of ruptured brain aneurysms lead to death, and women are one and one half times more likely to have brain aneurysms than men. Smoking, high blood pressure, and heavy alcohol consumption can increase a woman’s risk of suffering a ruptured brain aneurysm. Having an immediate family member with an aneurysm could also indicate that a woman is at higher risk. While aneurysms are most common between the ages of 35 and 60, they can still exist at any age. A woman with any of these risk factors should reduce her risk by quitting smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, working with her doctor to safely manage blood pressure and talking with her doctor about her family history of aneurysms.”Even if a woman has none of these risk factors, she’s still at risk for a brain aneurysm due to her gender,” said Britz, chairman of the Houston Methodist Hospital department of neurosurgery. “Lindsay is the perfect example of this. She had none of the known risk factors. That’s why all women should be familiar with the warning signs – a sudden severe headache or head pain, a very stiff neck, sudden vision changes, hearing or feeling a loud ‘snap’ in their head, or any of these symptoms coupled with nausea or vomiting.”Related StoriesDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsAfter feeling the snap in her head, Bowerman managed to call her father who happened to be close by. When he arrived five minutes later, he found her on the floor screaming in pain. When Bowerman arrived at Houston Methodist Hospital, Britz treated her with a coil embolization, which involves placing soft metal coils in the artery at the site of the rupture to stop the bleeding. He told Bowerman’s family that she had a 30% chance of survival if she woke up within 72 hours.”My sister was the first person to arrive back at the hospital the morning after surgery after my family was sent home with those numbers,” Bowerman said. “She said she heard my voice as soon as she got off the elevator and later told me it was the first tears of joy and hope she cried since the rupture. Days later, I knew who I was and could understand I was in the hospital, but I kept thinking it was 1999. I couldn’t wrap my head around the fact that it was 2018.”Bowerman was in the ICU for 15 days, but suffered no permanent damage from the aneurysm.”I never expected that I would go from being a perfectly healthy 36-year-old woman to nearly dying in front of my six and four-year-old sons,” Bowerman said. “They still refer to it as the day of mommy’s bad headache. I think of it as the day I could have died, and every single day I think about how lucky I am that instead I get to be here and see my boys grow up.” Source:Houston Methodist While we don’t know the reasons why, women are more likely to have brain aneurysms than men. So it’s really important for women to know the risk factors and take steps to reduce their risk.”Gavin Britz, M.D., a Houston Methodist neurosurgeon and director of the Houston Methodist Neurological Institutelast_img read more

Siemens says profits up on global upturn

Siemens, which runs its business year from October to September, said in a statement net profit jumped by 12 percent to 2.2 billion euros ($2.7 billion) in the three months to December.Underlying or operating profit was also up 12 percent at 2.2 billion euros while first-quarter sales grew by three percent to 19.8 billion euros.Chief executive Joe Kaeser said Siemens was “taking advantage of the global economic upturn.” By division, Siemens said that orders at its wind energy unit surged after a merger with Spanish firm Gamesa was finalised, even if profits shrank slightly over the quarter.In the factory automation division, orders and revenue jumped, especially in China, although the effects of a recent acquisition sapped profits.The train construction division, which recently announced a tie-up with French rival Alstom, reported a surge in orders, revenue and profits after it secured new contracts in Europe, Israel and the United States and its latest high-speed trains entered service in Germany.The medical devices business saw orders, revenue and profits fall back slightly in the first quarter, due to “significant currency headwinds”, but Siemens said the unit remained on track for a stock market flotation later this year.In the power and gas division, profits fell by almost half and orders and revenue declined as demand for its power plant turbines fell away.Siemens announced a massive restructuring in November, cutting nearly 7,000 job cuts worldwide in the traditional power plant building business.Looking ahead to the full year, Siemens was more cautious, saying that continuing headwinds in the energy market and “geopolitical uncertainties” painted a more “mixed picture”.It said it was pencilling in “modest growth in revenue” and earnings per share around the same level as in the 2016/2017 business year. Siemens abandons profit target after weak second quarter Citation: Siemens says profits up on global upturn (2018, January 31) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-siemens-profits-global-upturn.html German engineering giant Siemens said Wednesday that profits jumped in the first quarter, driven by rising demand for its products in areas ranging from renewable energy and trains to industrial robots. Explore further Siemens, which runs its business year from October to September, said net profit jumped by 12 percent to 2.2 billion euros ($2.7 billion) in the three months to December This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP read more

Report says radioactive monitors failed at nuclear plant

Citation: Report says radioactive monitors failed at nuclear plant (2018, March 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-radioactive-nuclear.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Crews cover partially-collapsed tunnel at nuclear site Contractor CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Co. on Thursday released its evaluation of what went wrong in December during demolition of the nuclear reservation’s highly contaminated Plutonium Finishing Plant.The Tri-City Herald reports the study said primary radioactive air monitors used at a highly hazardous Hanford project failed to detect contamination. Then, when the spread of contamination was detected, the report said steps taken to contain it didn’t fully work.At least 11 Hanford workers checked since mid-December inhaled or ingested small amounts of radioactive particles. Private and government vehicles were contaminated with radioactive particles.The sprawling site in southeastern Washington contains more than 50 million gallons of radioactive and toxic wastes in underground storage tanks. It’s owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, which hires private contractors to manage the cleanup work.Hanford was established during World War II and made the plutonium for the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. The 560-square mile site also made most of the plutonium for the nation’s nuclear arsenal during the Cold War.The report released Thursday said before the December spread of contamination, Hanford officials were relying primarily on continuous air monitors that check for airborne radioactive contamination in near real-time and sound an alarm if workers may be in danger.The monitors had worked in the past, including in June, when alarms sounded and workers were told to shelter in place.But the monitors did not detect airborne contamination in December, possibly because some of the particles that spread were too heavy to stay aloft.Officials had other signs that there might be a problem, including contamination found in monitors that workers wear on their lapels, yet continued to rely on the continuous air monitors.The CH2M report, which is now being reviewed by a Department of Energy panel, listed 42 steps to take in response to its findings, like changes to training for radiological workers. A new report says mistakes and mismanagement are to blame for the exposure of workers to radioactive particles at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. read more

Facebook apologizes for offensive autocomplete search results

Facebook search was not safe for work or home on Thursday night. Explore further Facebook asked users if pedophiles should be able to ask kids for ‘sexual pictures’ This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Typing “video of” into the Facebook search bar yielded a disturbing result. The first autocomplete was “video of girl sucking d—.”Jonah Bennett, a graduate student, researcher and journalist, says he was tipped off to the search bar snafu by a friend. He shared it on Twitter where others got the same search results.”Go to your Facebook search bar and type: video of,” Bennett wrote on Twitter, “and see what results show up.”A couple of hours later, Facebook results were back to normal. But then Bennett tried the search in Spanish: “videos de…” and the second result was live sex videos.Facebook said it’s investigating why the search predictions appeared.”We’re very sorry this happened. As soon as we became aware of these offensive predictions we removed them,” the company said in a statement to USA TODAY.”Facebook search predictions are representative of what people may be searching for on Facebook and are not necessarily reflective of actual content on the platform,” the statement said. “We do not allow sexually explicit imagery, and we are committed to keeping such content off of our site.”Last week the giant social network was criticized for asking users whether pedophiles should be able to proposition underage girls for sexually explicit photographs on the giant social network.Facebook wants to help users find what they are looking for amid the billions of status updates, photos and videos they post each day.For years people mostly used the search bar to find other Facebook users. In 2014, Facebook turned the search bar into a tool to find what everyone’s talking about. Type “Black Panther” or “Florida shooting” into the Facebook search bar and up pops what your friends and others are sharing on Facebook.Now Facebook is encountering the challenges that have bedeviled Google, the leader in search, which has spent years cleaning up racist, sexist and other objectionable autocomplete results. For example, when users typed in the phrase, “are Jews,” Google used to automatically suggest the question, “are Jews evil?”The autocomplete results are usually what Google algorithms have learned that people want to know when they search for something. They’re based, in part, on what other users have searched for. So Google has had to adjust the algorithm to banish autocomplete results that are violent, hateful, sexually explicit or dangerous, in violation of the company’s rules. ©2018 USA Today Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Citation: Facebook apologizes for offensive autocomplete search results (2018, March 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-facebook-offensive-autocomplete-results.html read more

Indonesias Lion Air buying 50 Boeing 737s in 62 bn deal

Founded in 1999 by brothers Kusnan and Rusdi Kirana, Lion Air is the first private airline in Indonesia, a sprawling archipelago nation that has struggled with a spotty air safety record India’s Jet Airways to buy 75 Boeing jets in multi-billion dollar order Citation: Indonesia’s Lion Air buying 50 Boeing 737’s in $6.2 bn deal (2018, April 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-indonesia-lion-air-boeing-bn.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP The new single-aisle plane is the latest incarnation of Boeing’s 737 MAX series, which can accommodate between 130 and 230 passengers and fly up to 3,850 nautical miles (7,130 kilometres), the companies said in a statement.The order—the largest to date for the MAX 10—was valued at $6.24 billion, although multi-plane deals tend to end up costing carriers less than list prices.The firms said the newest plane, which is to be delivered from 2020, “will be the most fuel-efficient and profitable single-aisle jet in the aviation industry”.”We signed this deal because we’re anticipating a growing numbers of passengers in the coming years and so we can increase the amount of our national and international flights,” Lion’s president director Edward Sirait told AFP.The low-cost carrier, which started less than 20 years ago with just one plane, stunned the sector in 2013 when it announced two of the world’s largest aircraft orders in a monster $46 billion deal.At the time, Lion agreed to buy 234 medium-haul A320 jets worth some $23.8 billion from European aerospace giant Airbus, after a $22.4 billion deal for 230 Boeing planes.Currently, the airline flies to nearly 80 mostly domestic destinations with international routes including Singapore, the Philippines, Malaysia, China, and Saudi Arabia.Founded in 1999 by brothers Kusnan and Rusdi Kirana, Lion Air is the first private low-cost airline in Indonesia, a sprawling archipelago nation that has struggled with a spotty air safety record.Some carriers, including Lion and national carrier Garuda, have on occasion been placed on travel blacklists over their lax safety standards.With some 260 million people, Indonesia is the world’s fourth most populous nation with more than 17,000 islands and is home to Southeast Asia’s biggest economy.The country has a burgeoning middle class which is keen to abandon travel by bus, ferry and train and instead take to the skies for holidays and family visits Indonesia’s Lion Air is buying 50 Boeing 737 MAX 10 airplanes in a deal valued at about $6.2 billion, the firms said Tuesday, as the carrier looks to cash in on a transport boom in the Southeast Asian nation. read more

Nissan sparks Brexit shockwaves through UK auto sector

first_img The Japanese carmaker revealed Sunday that the crossover vehicle would no longer be manufactured at its vast plant in Sunderland, northeastern England, despite Brexit assurances from the government.Nissan has become the latest corporate big-hitter to slash investment in the face of heightened economic uncertainty and a potential no-deal Brexit.”Brexit uncertainty has decimated investment in the UK auto industry and until that position is clarified, manufacturers are struggling to find a risk-free case for investing further here,” Cardiff University professor Peter Wells told AFP.”Clearly there is a feeling that the short-term to medium-term investment opportunities here are not what they were—and they are certainly higher risk.”And I think there are real concerns over access to European markets and access to markets where the European Union has established agreements.”The sprawling facility, producing cars destined for the European continent, also faces weak demand for high-polluting diesel cars—which face tighter regulation worldwide.”The ongoing backlash against diesel… has affected not just Nissan but other companies here, and that’s exacerbated the other problems faced by the industry as a whole,” added Wells.In Britain alone, new car sales slid in 2018 on weak demand for diesel vehicles, as consumers continued to ditch diesel cars for automobiles seen as more environmentally-friendly. Nissan’s decision is sending shockwaves through the industry This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further It’s not the same without him Nissan cancels investment plan for UK plant Some commentators argue that the recent sacking of disgraced Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn likely also prompt the decision.”I think that he (Ghosn) was critical in getting the assurances from the UK government and making the decision to bring production to the UK,” Aston Business School professor David Bailey told the BBC.”It was shortly after his demise I said… that we may see a re-evaluation of some of those investment decisions, that is exactly what we’ve seen.”Nissan has committed to the manufacture in Sunderland of the current Qashqai, Leaf and Juke models and the new Qashqai from 2020. The giant is a major employer in the city, a former industrial powerhouse that has suffered decades of economic decline.No-deal threatHowever, professor Christian Stadler at Warwick Business School warned that Nissan could shift even more production in the event of no deal.”Should it be a hard Brexit, I would not be surprised if also the decision to produce the Juke and the Qashqai might be re-examined,” he told AFP.”If you have no trade (deal) with Europe then it might make more sense that you produce them in Japan and ship them from over there. At least you have a trade agreement.”Britain is currently on course to crash out of the bloc on March 29 after MPs last month voted massively against a divorce deal struck between May and EU leaders in December.”The government’s Brexit negotiations didnt deliver what … Nissan was hoping would come out of this,” added Stadler.Global automakers are also struggling in the face of China’s economic slowdown, alongside its ongoing trade row with the United States.”China has been the fastest growing market for automobile producers for years and we have seen most recently for the first time a decline on the demand side,” Stadler noted.”You might still have to factor in reduced demand in China. That’s a big worry for the industry.” It’s not all because of Brexit: Tighter diesel regulations are also part of the story © 2019 AFP Nissan’s decision to axe planned production of the X-Trail SUV in the Brexit-backing city of Sunderland is a heavy blow to the British auto sector, which repeatedly warned against quitting the EU. Clock ticks to BrexitNissan has decided to move assembly of X-Trail cars to its global production hub on the island of Kyushu in southern Japan, reversing a decision made in October 2016.Shockwaves quickly spread to London, where Prime Minister Theresa May faces an uphill battle to agree a Brexit deal with Brussels as the clock ticks down to EU departure on March 29.Sunderland, which has a population of 300,000, voted in favour of leaving the European Union in the June 2016 referendum.”Nissan’s announcement is a blow to the sector and the region,” said Business Secretary Greg Clark.The company employs 7,000 people at the Sunderland plant—its largest in Europe—which has produced cars since 1986. Citation: Nissan sparks Brexit shockwaves through UK auto sector (2019, February 4) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-nissan-brexit-shockwaves-uk-auto.htmllast_img read more

Virtual cleanroom could increase safety minimize risks reduce education costs for pharmaceutical

first_imgThe virtual interactive cleanroom is divided into two environments: the standard cleanroom and a special room for hazardous products. The on-demand instructional format provides direct real-time feedback and testing capabilities. It offers training consistent with accreditation standards for pharmacy technician and pharmacist education and training programs.”At Purdue we are all about taking our knowledge and resources out into the world to improve the quality of life for people near and far,” Abel said. “This is an extraordinary example of Purdue taking our expertise in pharmacy and turning it into a useful tool to save lives through better medication preparation.”Abel worked with undergraduate and graduate students in the Purdue Polytechnic Institute to create the virtual cleanroom. ASHP launches pharmacy technician forum Explore further Now, a Purdue University-affiliated startup has come up with an interactive and virtual way to teach future pharmacists and technicians how to properly prepare and handle medications and other products found in pharmacies.Penguin Innovations, founded by Steve Abel, a professor of pharmacy practice in Purdue’s College of Pharmacy and Purdue’s associate provost for engagement, created a virtual interactive cleanroom (VIC). Those sterile rooms, where medications are prepared, are common in hospitals and pharmaceutical labs.”The more you practice, the better you become,” Abel said. “Our virtual cleanroom environment provides a space to accelerate learning while overcoming the barriers of cost and limited resources.”Abel said colleges and pharmacy technician training programs could save up to $18,000 per student in drug and supply costs from preparing just one dose of the available products in the VIC. The virtual room has about 70 of the most commonly prescribed drug products, along with their actual product labeling, including adult, pediatric and hazardous products. Citation: Virtual cleanroom could increase safety, minimize risks, reduce education costs for pharmaceutical professionals (2019, March 20) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-virtual-cleanroom-safety-minimize-pharmaceutical.html A deadly meningitis outbreak linked to a Massachusetts pharmaceutical lab has drawn new interest to the way drugs are made in the United States and the training for those who work in pharmacies.center_img The virtual cleanroom has about 70 of the most commonly prescribed drug products, along with their actual product labeling, including adult, pediatric and hazardous products. Credit: Purdue University Penguin Innovations, a Purdue University-affiliated startup, created a virtual interactive cleanroom to teach future pharmacists and technicians how to properly prepare and handle medications and other products found in pharmacies. Credit: Purdue University Provided by Purdue University This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Senior tribal BJP leader Anusuiya Uikey appointed as Chhattisgarh Governor

first_img Next Senior tribal BJP leader Anusuiya Uikey appointed as Chhattisgarh GovernorAnusuiya Uikey has replaced Anandiben Patel, who as Governor of Madhya Pradesh was also holding the charge of Chhattisgarh following the demise of Chhattisgarh Governor Balram Das Tandon on August 2018.advertisement Rahul Noronha BhopalJuly 17, 2019UPDATED: July 17, 2019 00:09 IST Anusuiya Uikey is the first tribal to hold the charge of Governor since the state’s formation in 2000. (Photo credit: ANI)HIGHLIGHTSSenior tribal BJP leader from Madhya Pradesh Anusuiya Uikey on Tuesday was appointed as Chhattisgarh GovernorAnusuiya Uikey is the first tribal to hold the charge of Governor since the state’s formation in 2000Presently, she is the vice-chairperson of the national commission for scheduled tribesSenior tribal BJP leader from Madhya Pradesh Anusuiya Uikey on Tuesday was appointed as the Governor of Chhattisgarh.Anusuiya Uikey has replaced Anandiben Patel, who as Governor of Madhya Pradesh was also holding the charge of Chhattisgarh following the demise of Chhattisgarh Governor Balram Das Tandon on August 2018.Anusuiya Uikey is the first tribal to hold the charge of Governor since the state’s formation in 2000.Incidentally, the senior tribal BJP leader is also the first full-time woman Governor in the state as Anandiben Patel was holding additional charges.Anusuiya Uikey hails from Chhindwara, the Lok Sabha constituency that was earlier represented by Chief Minister Kamal Nath for nine terms.The tribal woman was a lecturer of economics at a government college in Chhindwara district before she joined politics.Anusuiya Uikey began her political career in the Congress party and became an MLA in 1985 in Madhya Pradesh.She then became a minister in the state cabinet in 1988.It was in the early 1990s that she joined the BJP and became chairperson of the Madhya Pradesh state commission for scheduled tribes.Senior BJP leader also became a member of the national commission for women in 2000.Anusuiya Uikey has been a Rajya Sabha MP from Madhya Pradesh between 2006 and 2012.Presently, Anusuiya Uikey is the vice-chairperson of the national commission for scheduled tribes.Tribals constitute about 34 per cent of the population of Chhattisgarh.Political analysts suggest that by appointing Anusuiya Uikey the BJP has taken another step in wooing the tribal electorate in the state.Earlier, the party appointed a tribal, Vikram Usendi, as party chief after the Vidhan Sabha elections.ALSO READ | DGPs of Arunachal, Mizoram, Puducherry transferred, NDMC chairman shiftedALSO WATCH | Day before Amarnath Yatra begins, Modi govt tightens security arrangementsFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byPrakriti Sharmalast_img read more

Indiana Jones Meets Star Wars in Archaeology From Space Enter to Win

first_imgWhat is it like to uncover the mysteries of ancient civilizations … from space? Archaeologist Sarah Parcak is a pioneer in the field of space archaeology, using images from satellites orbiting high above Earth to detect long-buried signs of cultures that thrived millennia ago. Her work in Egypt resulted in a breakthrough map of the legendary city of Tanis, made famous in the movie “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” But while Parcak’s fictional counterpart Indiana Jones dug through dusty sand and crawled through jungles to reach remote sites, much of Parcak’s work is conducted on computers, analyzing images that use infrared and lasers to peer below the ground and reveal ancient secrets hidden far below.OTD in Space – July 17: X-15 Breaks Altitude RecordOn July 17, 1962, the American test pilot Bob White broke the world record for the highest altitude flight. He took off from Edwards Air Force Base in a rocket-powered X-15 aircraft and made it to an altitude of 314,750 feet. That’s almost 60 miles! At the time, the Air Force considered the edge of space to be 50 miles above the Earth. So White received astronaut wings for his record-breaking spaceflight.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放OTD in Space – July 16: Apollo 11 Launches to the Moon00:43关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65918-archaeology-from-space-giveaway.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3400:34  In Parcak’s new book “Archaeology from Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Company, 2019), she offers readers a tantalizing glimpse of the technologies that make space archaeology possible; she also reveals extraordinary discoveries that satellites have brought to the surface for the first time in thousands of years. Live Science sits down with Parcak on Facebook Live today (July 12) at 11:30 a.m. ET, for an interview about her book and her two decades of field work spanning five continents. We’ll also be giving away two copies of “Archaeology from Space” (one copy per winner). To participate, leave a comment on the post by 12:01 a.m on July 15. Winners will be selected at random. The contest rules are below. Don’t forget to check Facebook and Twitter for updates on this contest and other live-video events. ‘Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past’ Giveaway Official Rules NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Open to legal residents of 50 U.S & D.C., 18 or older. Employees, agents, officers & directors of Future plc (“Sponsor”), its parent, subsidiaries, affiliates & advertising & promotion agencies (collectively with Facebook, Inc., “Released Parties”) & members of their immediate family (spouse, parent, children, siblings & their respective spouses, regardless of where they reside) & persons living in the same household, whether or not related, are not eligible. Void where prohibited. Subject to all applicable federal, state & local laws. HOW TO ENTER: At any time between 11:30 a.m. ET on Friday, July 12, 2019, and 12:30 a.m. ET on Monday, July 15, 2019 (the “Entry Period”), visit the Live Science page on Facebook (“Event Page”), find the post about the giveaway and leave a comment to the post. If, for whatever reason, the Event is cancelled or postponed, this giveaway will not occur. Entries generated by script, macro or other automated means or by any means that subvert the entry process are void. Limit one (1) entry per person/Facebook ID. Multiple entries will be void. Entries become the sole property of Sponsor. Entry must not be offensive or inappropriate, as determined by Sponsor in its sole discretion. Sponsor reserves the right to disqualify any entry and remove any comment that it determines, in its sole discretion, is not in compliance with these Official Rules or is otherwise not in keeping with Sponsor’s image. WINNER DETERMINATION: Three winners will be randomly selected from the eligible individuals who posted comments during the Entry Period. If, by the end of the Entry Period, no eligible comments are provided, the prize will not be awarded. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. WINNER NOTIFICATION: Potential winners will be notified via a comment on his/her winning post and via Facebook Messenger & he/she will have 24 hours from notification to respond to Sponsor. The failure to respond to such notification or the potential winner’s noncompliance with these Official Rules may result in disqualification, & at Sponsor’s sole discretion, prize may be awarded to an alternate winner. Prize: A copy of “Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (2 prizes available). Approximate Retail Value: $30.00. Total Prize is awarded “as is” with no warranty or guarantee, either express or implied. Winner is responsible for all federal, state & local taxes. Winner may not substitute, assign or transfer prize, but Sponsor reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to substitute prize (or portion thereof) with one of comparable or greater value. Prize cannot be redeemed for cash. All prize details are at Sponsor’s sole discretion. GRANT OF RIGHTS: By submitting an entry, each entrant grants to Sponsor and its licensees, successors and assigns an irrevocable, perpetual, unlimited, royalty-free, fully paid-up license to reproduce, distribute, display, exhibit, exploit, perform, edit, create derivatives of, & otherwise use the entry & all elements of such entry, together with any other material, and the name, user name, city & state of residence, voice, image and/or likeness of entrant, in any & all media now known or hereafter devised, in any manner, in whole or in part, worldwide, without compensation or notification to, or permission from, entrant or any third party, for any purpose whatsoever, including without limitation, for purposes of advertising or trade.  CONDITIONS: By participating, each entrant agrees: (a) to abide by these Official Rules & decisions of Sponsor & judges, which shall be final & binding in all respects relating to this giveaway; and (b) to release, discharge & hold harmless Released Parties from any & all injuries, liability, losses & damages of any kind to persons, including death, or property resulting, in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, from entrant’s participation in the Giveaway or the acceptance or use of prize.  Released Parties are not responsible for (i) lost, late, incomplete, damaged, inaccurate, stolen, delayed, misdirected, undelivered or garbled entries; or (ii) errors or difficulties of any kind, whether human, mechanical, electronic, computer, network, typographical, printing or otherwise, relating to or in connection with the giveaway, including, without limitation, errors or difficulties which may occur in connection with the administration of the giveaway, the processing of entries, the announcement of the prize or in any giveaway-related materials.  Persons who tamper with or abuse any aspect of the giveaway or the Event Page, who act in an unsportsmanlike or disruptive manner or who are in violation of these Official Rules, as solely determined by Sponsor, will be disqualified & all associated entries will be void. Should any portion of the giveaway be, in Sponsor’s sole opinion, compromised by virus, worms, bugs, nonauthorized human intervention or other causes which, in the sole opinion of the Sponsor, corrupt or impair the administration, security, fairness or proper play, or submission of entries, Sponsor reserves the right at its sole discretion to suspend, modify or terminate the giveaway & if terminated, at its discretion, select winner as deemed fair & appropriate by Sponsor. Information submitted in connection with this giveaway will be used in accordance with Sponsor’s Privacy Policy, available at https://www.futureplc.com/privacy-policy/.   WINNERS’ NAMES: Winners’ names will be posted on the Event Page following the end of the giveaway.  Sponsor: Future plc, 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, New York 10036. This giveaway is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. You understand that you are providing your information to Sponsor & not to Facebook. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoAnti-Snoring SolutionA Simple Fix for Snoring And Sleep ApneaAnti-Snoring SolutionUndolast_img read more

Juno Finds Mysterious Unexpected Currents Crackling Through Jupiters Magnetosphere

first_img Science Fact or Fantasy? 20 Imaginary Worlds There are turbulent, unexpected currents crackling through Jupiter’s atmosphere, producing brilliant auroras. Juno, the NASA probe that has orbited the gas giant since 2016, passes over Jupiter’s polar regions ever 53.5 days, collecting data on the magnetic forces that produce ultrabright auroras above the huge planet. In a new paper, published July 8 in the journal Nature Astronomy, researchers working with Juno’s data discovered that the electric currents passing through Jupiter’s magnetosphere — the region of its atmosphere richest with magnetic field lines — don’t act as expected. The probe found less direct current — current that constantly flows in one direction — than physicists predicted. It was only about 50 million amperes, an incredibly powerful current, but not as high as theoretical models of Jupiter’s magnetosphere suggested would be present. That finding suggests that “alternating current” — current that flickers back and forth — plays a much bigger role in producing Jupiter’s auroras than anyone realized, the researchers wrote. On Jupiter, as on Earth, auroras are a product of whirling currents in magnetic fields interacting with high-energy particles from the sun. [10 Places in the Solar System We’d Most Like to Visit]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65951-jupiter-currents-magnetosphere-tesla.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “These observations, combined with other Juno spacecraft measurements, show that alternating currents play a much greater role in generating Jupiter’s aurora than the direct current system,” Joachim Saur, an author of the paper, said in a statement. On Earth, we typically think of alternating and direct currents (AC and DC) in terms of electronics. Famously, in the late 19th century, inventors Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla disagreed sharply over which method should be used to deliver power to electrical devices. DC power doesn’t convert as easily between different voltages, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), so Tesla wanted to turn the more-easily convertible AC into the standard. Edison, guarding his DC-dependant patents, resisted the change and spread misinformation that AC was more dangerous, according to the DOE. Tesla won out in the end, and AC became the standard for U.S. power plants. However, according to the DOE, direct current has regained favor as more battery-powered devices have come to market. Your lights are probably running on AC power, but there’s a good chance the device you’re reading this on relies on DC. (That’s why your laptop requires an AC adapter.) In the space around Jupiter, the proportion of AC to DC isn’t determined by feuding pre-modern inventors, but by the behavior of ions in the planet’s atmosphere. Jupiter has powerful currents than Earth for several reasons, including its huge size, its fast rate of spin and the excess of charged particles (ions) pumped out from volcanoes on the moon Io. That such a large proportion of those currents are AC seems to be a result of turbulence in the planet’s magnetic fields, the researchers wrote. Turbulence in this sense refers to the disordered way in which the magnetic fields’ shape and directionality fluctuates. And that turbulence is producing different effects at each of Jupiter’s two poles. In the time Juno has orbited Jupiter, the planet’s north pole has experienced about half the current of the south pole, the researchers wrote. That seems to be a result of the much more complex arrangement of magnetic field lines in the north, which interrupts the flow of currents. In the south, they wrote, the magnetic field lines are “smoother.” The effects of those differences are visible in the two poles’ auroras, they noted. In the north, the auroras tend to be more widely dispersed, with a structure of “filaments and flares.” In the south, the auroras tend to be more structured, with a “bright arc” extending out from the main oval where auroras occur. This research on Jupiter’s powerful magnetic fields, the researchers wrote, could inform their understanding of Earth’s weaker magnetic field — humanity’s main protection against harsh solar particles. Some researchers already suspected turbulence produced a significant proportion of currents around our planet. This work seems to lend credence to that idea. The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics 5 Mars Myths and Misconceptions Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoLivestlyThis List Ranks The Dog Breeds You’ll Want To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoHistory A2ZMan Who Escaped Alcatraz Sends FBI Letter After Being Free For 50 YearsHistory A2ZUndoWorldemandThe One And Only WD40 Trick Everyone Should KnowWorldemandUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndolast_img read more

Cats in Australia Kill Over 2 Billion Wild Animals Each Year

first_imgWhen cats roam free, small wild animals die. And the body count in Australia exceeds 2 billion native animals per year. Environmental researchers in Australia compiled the alarming figure by combing through hundreds of studies on the predatory habits of Australia’s free-ranging pet cats as well as feral felines. The scientists documented cats’ historic and ongoing toll on Australian wildlife in the book “Cats in Australia” (CSIRO Publishing, 2019). In just one day, Australia’s millions of cats kill approximately 1.3 million birds, 1.8 million reptiles and over 3.1 million mammals. [In Photos: The Peskiest Alien Mammals]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65915-australia-cats-wildlife-killers.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Cats were introduced to Australia in the 18th century by European colonizers, and a report in 2017 found that feral cats could be found in 99.8% of the continent, including on 80% of Australia’s islands. Current estimates of the number of feral cats in Australia range from about 2 million to more than 6 million during years with a lot of rainfall, when prey is abundant. And every feral cat kills about 740 native animals annually, co-author Sarah Legge, a principal research fellow with the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Australia’s University of Queensland, said in a statement. There are also about 4 million pet cats in Australia. Pet owners who allow their cats to spend time outdoors may never witness their beloved animal’s killer instincts. Yet a single pet cat kills, on average, about 75 animals each year. That may not sound like much compared to the death toll racked up by feral cats. However, urban cat populations tend to be denser than in rural areas; with about 180 cats per square mile (60 per square kilometer) wildlife in urban areas pay a deadly price, Legge explained. “As a result, cats in urban areas kill many more animals per square kilometer each year than cats in the bush,” she said. A feral cat pauses for the camera after killing an Australian rosella parrot. Credit: Brisbane City Council Meet the Rare and Fabulous Felines of ‘Super Cats’ (Photos) Australian officials are exploring multiple strategies for controlling populations of feral cats, including shooting, trapping and poisoning them with bait such as toxic sausages. Such culls are expected to eradicate around 2 million cats by 2020, but some species of vulnerable Australian wildlife may be running out of time, said study co-author Christopher Dickman, a professor in terrestrial ecology with the School of Life and Environmental Sciences at the University of Sydney. Cats are recognized as a threat to 35 species of birds, 36 mammal species, seven reptile species and three amphibian species, according to Australia’s Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPAC). “Many of Australia’s native species cannot withstand these high levels of predation and will become increasingly at risk of extinction unless the problem of cats in Australia is solved,” Dickman said in the statement. Here, Kitty, Kitty: 10 Facts for Cat Lovers Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Reveals: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoairdogusa.comThe World’s Best Washable Air Purifierairdogusa.comUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndo Photos: See the World Through a Cat’s Eyeslast_img read more